“Wisdom…. comes not from age, but from education and learning.” – Anton Chekhov. 

Today we’re going to explore metrics relating to training.  This is Part 4 of our series.  If you haven’t read Part 1, I recommend you go back and start there, as it sets the stage regarding why certain metrics should be chosen.  We’ve already explored metrics that can be used with policies and procedures, which can be found HERE, and monitoring and auditing, which can be found HERE.

Generally speaking, metrics relating to training can be broken down into two groups: metrics that measure the quantity, and metrics that measure quality.  Both are useful for different reasons. 

Quantity Metrics

Metrics that measure quantity measure a number.  For instance, many companies track the number of people who took training, or the number of training sessions given in a quarter or year.  Quantity metrics may also be given in percentage.  For example, many companies track the percentage of employees who complete mandatory training.  Quantity metrics allow the company to know the breadth of training delivery.  They also allow the company to know if mandatory training is being completed, and how many people, or percentage of the employee base, have opted to attend optional training sessions.

Quality Metrics

The metrics that measure quality measure effectiveness. For instance, many companies track the number of people who took training, or the number of training sessions given in a quarter or year.  Quantity metrics may also be given in percentage.  For example, many companies track the percentage of employees who complete mandatory training.  Quantity metrics allow the company to know the breadth of training delivery.  They also allow the company to know if mandatory training is being completed, and how many people, or percentage of the employee base, have opted to attend optional training sessions.

Quality Metrics

The metrics that measure quality measure effectiveness.  For example, many companies use surveys after a training session to determine whether the employees liked or understood the material presented in the training session.  Quality metrics tell a company whether the training it deployed was useful and provided education that can be used by employees to make them better at their job, and allow them to avoid risky behavior.

So What?

The most important question when it comes to metrics is this: So what?  Each metric needs context, so it tells a story.  In addition, each metric needs to be tied to a goal or Key Performance Indicator (KPI), so you can tell if the trend is going in the right direction.  Metrics without context are useless.  When you choose a metric, make sure you ask, “So what?”  If you can’t answer why the metric matters, or what the goal is for that metric, choose something else. 

Examples

Following you’ll find example metrics for training.  Not all the examples will fit your program.  Metrics, by their nature, need to be tailored so that they match the maturity of your program, the nature of your business, the size and geographical expanse of your business, etc. For each, a “So What?” answer and example KPI or goal is included. 


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Notice that the quality metrics inform the quantity metrics, and vice versa.  Just because 95% of employees completed the Code of Conduct course doesn’t mean it was effective.  And just because 95% of employees rated the course “Good” or “Great,” that doesn’t mean that the training had the reach it needed to if only 45% of employees took the course.  When defining your training metrics, try to have a balance of quality and quantity metrics.

Good metrics tell the story of your program.  They show its evolution and give you confidence in its effectiveness.  By tracking the correct metrics, you’ll be able to show the compliance program’s growth in raw data to the C-suite and Board of Directors.  

Next time in our series, we’ll be examining metrics relating to communications.  In the meantime, have an excellent week! 

Want help developing your metrics, KPI’s or monitoring program?  Send us an email at info@sparkcompliance.com for a free consultation (or visit our website at www.sparkcompliance.com).